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Contact:
Tom Missel
Director of Media Relations and Marketing
P.O. Box 2509
Office of Communications 
St. Bonaventure University 
St. Bonaventure, NY 14778

Phone: (716) 375-2303
Fax: (716) 375-2380
Email: tmissel@sbu.edu 


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Contact:
Steve Mest
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P.O. Box G, Reilly Center
St. Bonaventure University
St. Bonaventure, NY 14778
Phone: (716) 375-2319
Fax: (716) 375-2382
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#Bonas professor has article published in Journal of Physical Chemistry C

Jan 05, 2017 |

Scott SimpsonDr. Scott Simpson, an assistant professor of chemistry at St. Bonaventure University, has had an article published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Physical Chemistry C.

Published Nov. 30, 2016, the article investigated how to theoretically model iron porphyrin on a metal surface. Simpson’s research determined that this molecule can be switched between two spin states, similar to how a light switch is turned on and off. 

“These molecules (porphyrins) have great potential to be used as molecular spintronics,” Simpson said. “Understanding and determining molecules that can be spintronics is necessary for producing quantum computers. Quantum computers have the potential to perform calculations faster than currently used silicon-based computers.”

Simpson said the findings are important not only because of the speed of the computers, but also the size of them. 

“Current computers have a size restriction due to the physical limitations of the transistors that are used in them,” he said. “However, quantum computers can get past this limitation.”

Simpson worked with collaborators from the University at Buffalo (notably, Dan Miller and Prof. Eva Zurek), Jagiellonian University in Poland, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Penn State-Behrend, and the Univerität Bayreuth in Germany.

The Journal of Physical Chemistry C publishes studies on energy conversion and storage; energy and charge transport; surfaces, interfaces, porous materials, and catalysis; plasmonics, optical materials, and hard matter; physical processes in nanomaterials; and nanostructures.

Simpson, who has a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University at Buffalo and a bachelor’s in chemistry from SUNY-Fredonia, joined the St. Bonaventure faculty in the fall. He is a 2006 graduate of Allegany-Limestone Central School.

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About the University: The nation’s first Franciscan university, we believe in the goodness of every person and in the ability of every person to do extraordinary things.  St. Bonaventure University cultivates graduates who are confident and creative communicators, collaborative leaders and team members, and innovative problem solvers who are respectful of themselves, others, and the diverse world around them. Named the #6 best college value in the North by U.S. News and World Report, we are establishing pathways to internships, graduate schools and careers in the context of our renowned liberal arts tradition. 

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